Archaeologists unearth 20 well-preserved wooden coffins in Egypt deemed to be the ‘biggest most important discovery’ in years

  • Archaeologists have found at least 20 coffins near the Egyptian city of Luxor
  • Each on appears to be well-preserved and still vividly colorful from when they were first buried 
  • Date back to the Middle, New Kingdom and the Late Periods, which took placed from 1994 B.C. to 332 B.C

 

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Archaeologist have stumbled upon what is deemed the ‘biggest and most important’ discovery in years near the Egyptian city of Luxor.

At least 20 well-preserved, vividly painted wooden coffins have been unearth in the ancient town of West Thebes.

The treasure trove includes tombs dating back to the Middle, New Kingdom and the Late Periods, which took occurred in the years 1994 B.C. to 332 B.C.

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Archaeologist have stumbled upon what is deemed the 'biggest and most important' discovery in years near the Egyptian city of Luxor. At least 20 well-preserved, vividly painted wooden coffins have been unearth in the ancient town of West Thebes

Archaeologist have stumbled upon what is deemed the ‘biggest and most important’ discovery in years near the Egyptian city of Luxor. At least 20 well-preserved, vividly painted wooden coffins have been unearth in the ancient town of West Thebes

Experts have provided few details of the discovery, but have shared stunning pictures of the vibrant coffins with their vivid inscriptions and paintings, according to AP.

The coffins which are considered one of the ‘biggest and most important’ discoveries in recent years, are found in the Asasif Necropolis.

The area is called the Asasif Tombs because it is surrounded by burials.

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It sits between the Deir al-Bahri and the Tombs of the Nobles, and next to the Temple of Hatshepsut on the West Bank of Luxor, reports AncientPages.com

The treasure trove includes tombs dating back to the Middle, New Kingdom and the Late Periods, which took occurred in the years 1994 B.C. to 332 B.C

The treasure trove includes tombs dating back to the Middle, New Kingdom and the Late Periods, which took occurred in the years 1994 B.C. to 332 B.C

And earlier discoveries had found tombs belonging to Anch-Hor, Kheru-Ef, Montuemhet, and Pabasa. 

Beneath the sandy ground are underground rooms and a gallery leading to the tomb of Kheru-Ef during the reign of Amenhotep III. At first, this period in Egypt was first ruled by

The ministry says it will release further details at a news conference on Saturday.  

Less than a week ago, archaeologists made a discovery inside a coffin that was also astounding — the oldest oldest copy of a ‘map for the soul to attain eternal life’. 

Experts have provided few details of the discovery, but have shared stunning pictures of the vibrant coffins with their vivid inscriptions and paintings. The coffins which are considered one of the 'biggest and most important' discoveries in recent years, are found in the Asasif Necropolis

Experts have provided few details of the discovery, but have shared stunning pictures of the vibrant coffins with their vivid inscriptions and paintings. The coffins which are considered one of the ‘biggest and most important’ discoveries in recent years, are found in the Asasif Necropolis

‘The Book of Two Ways’ was supposed to help the deceased navigate through a dangerous landscape of fiery lakes and knife wielding demons to make it to the realm of Osiris. 

The burial shaft housing the coffin was unearthed in 2012, but has now been found to have been constructed 4,000 years ago. 

The engravings have also revealed the coffin’s inhabitant is not an overlord, but an elite woman.

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‘The Book of Two Ways’ refers to two paths that zig zag a dangerous route through obstacles and demonic entities towards ‘Rostau’ or the realm of Osiris. 

Less than a week ago, archaeologists made a discovery inside a coffin that was also astounding -- the oldest oldest copy of a 'map for the soul to attain eternal life' (pictured). The etchings were found on the side of another wooden coffin in Tel Aviv

Less than a week ago, archaeologists made a discovery inside a coffin that was also astounding — the oldest oldest copy of a ‘map for the soul to attain eternal life’ (pictured). The etchings were found on the side of another wooden coffin in Tel Aviv 

It was believed that anyone who laid on the body of Osiris would never die.

And now it is determined that the etching found on the side of the coffin is the oldest copy known to man.

The ancient map for the dead is etched in two wood panels and although versions have been found on other coffins, this is the oldest in history.

 

 



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