Global Economy

Bank of England governor warns inflation will be 'a bit bumpy' this year, but no cause for alarm


LONDON — The governor of the Bank of England on Thursday warned inflation was likely to be “a bit bumpy” this year, but insisted there was little reason to panic over the medium term.

His comments come shortly after the central bank upgraded its outlook for the U.K. economy. The central bank now believes the U.K. is on track for growth of 7.25% this year, slightly above analyst expectations and up from a previous estimate of 5%.

The U.K.’s comparatively quick vaccination rollout, a decline in the number of Covid-19 cases nationwide and the gradual easing of restrictions on economic activity were cited as reasons that led the central bank to revise its 2021 growth forecast.

On inflation, the BOE said it expects the consumer prices index to temporarily climb above its 2% target toward the end of this year, predominantly driven by developments in commodity prices.

It sees inflation returning to around 2% over the medium term.

“We think currently the policy setting is appropriate. We have got a forecast that has a very substantially strong bounce back but thereafter it comes back more into balance,” Andrew Bailey, governor of the BOE, told CNBC’s Joumanna Bercetche on Thursday.

Andrew Bailey, governor of the Bank of England, poses for a photograph on his first day in the post at the central bank in the City of London, U.K., on Monday, March 16, 2020.

Jason Alden | Bloomberg | Getty Images

“There will be an upturn in inflation this year because there are so-called base effects. Energy prices were very low this time last year and that’s coming out, so these effects will take place,” he continued.

Read More   PM Modi launches Ayushman Bharat health scheme. Here's all you need to know

“Inflation is going to be a bit bumpy this year in that sense as these base effects come in and out. At the moment, we are not seeing evidence that alarms us in terms of will this become embedded in higher inflation. But we will watch it very carefully,” Bailey said.

The U.K. economy contracted 10% in 2020 as a result of the coronavirus pandemic — the worst annual performance in more than three centuries.

It was more severe when compared with most other European economies, partly due to a slower move to implement strict public health measures to curb the spread of the coronavirus.



READ SOURCE

Leave a Reply

This website uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you accept our use of cookies.