Chandrayaan 2


Chandrayaan 2&nbsp


Key Highlights

  • Chandrayaan 2 has sent back its first images of the moon
  • Chandrayaan 2 is India’s most ambitious deep-space mission to date
  • Chandrayaan 2 was recently inserted into the Moon’s orbit and is now en-route to reaching the Moon by September 7

India’s most ambitious deep-space mission to date, Chandrayaan 2, recently completed the most complex and challenging manoeuvres in its journey to the Moon. The mission successfully entered the Moon’s orbit and then received congratulatory messages not only from the scientific community but Prime Minister Modi himself. 

And now, en-route to the Moon, Chandrayaan 2 has sent back its first images of Earth’s closest lunar object. As Chandrayaan 2 inches closer to the Moon with ISRO finally inserting it in the lunar orbit with the help of liquid engine boosters, expect more such images in the coming days. 

 

 

Earlier, Chandrayaan 2 released the first set of images of the Earth captured by Chandrayaan-2 Vikram Lander. The images were released on August 4.

With the insertion into the Moon’s orbit using liquid engine boosters, Chandrayaan 2 has finally inched closer to its eventual goal. The information of the insertion was first shared with the world by the Chairman of Indian Space Research Organisation, K Sivan, who announced that the space agency had “crossed a major milestone” and is now on track for successful completion. 

 

 

Chandrayaan 2: The road ahead

ISRO’s Chandrayaan 2 mission is one of the most complex ones to have ever been attempted by ISRO. It comprises of three segments — the Orbiter (weighing 2,379 kg, eight payloads), the lander ‘Vikram’ (1,471 kg, four payloads) and rover ‘Pragyan’ (27 kg, two payloads).

After completing the Trans Lunar Insertion, Chandrayaan 2 will now move on to Lunar bound manoeuvres. Post that, the lander Vikram will separate from Chandrayaan 2 and Vikram will touch down on the Moon’s South Pole.

According to ISRO, the lander Vikram will land on the Moon on September 7. If all goes to plan, this indigenously made and operated lunar mission will make India only the fourth nation in the world — behind US, Russia and China — to have reached the surface of the Moon. However, what will make it truly special is that it will also be the first space mission to land on the south polar region — the dark side of the Moon. 

 





READ SOURCE

READ  Hawaii’s Kilauea disaster: Tasmanian scientists with key volcano study - NEWS.com.au

WHAT YOUR THOUGHTS

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here