Health

Daily Covid cases hit 12-week high as Chris Whitty warns of ‘exceptionally difficult’ winter



T

he UK recorded 45,066 more cases of Covid-19 – the highest daily figure since July 20 – on Thursday as England’s chief medical officer warned this winter is going to be “exceptionally difficult” for the NHS.

The latest tally represents a five per cent rise on the previous day when 42,776 confirmed cases were reported, which was the most single-day cases since July 21.

It takes the UK’s seven-day rolling Covid infection rate to 381 per 100,000 population.

Some 277,875 cases have been recorded in the past seven days, a 13 per cent rise on the previous week.

Separate Test and Trace figures showed a total of 212,880 people tested positive for Covid-19 in England at least once in the week to October 6, up two per cent on the previous week. This is the highest number to test positive since the week to July 21.

Meanwhile the Government said a further 157 people had died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid-19 as of Thursday, bringing the UK’s official death toll to 138,237.

The number of daily Covid deaths has generally been edging upwards since the start of the month, although the curve is flatter than it is for cases.

Some 823 fatalities have been recorded over the past seven days, a nine per cent rise on the previous week.

Press Association Images

However daily Covid-19 hospital admissions remains largely flat. The latest data, provided on October 10, shows 719 people were admitted to hospital with Covid. There were some 5,423 admissions over seven days, which is only 5.8 per cent up on the previous week.

Speaking to delegates at the annual conference of the Royal College of GPs in Liverpool on Thursday, Professor Chris Whitty warned of tough months ahead for the health service as it battles Covid-19, flu, other viruses.

But he praised GPs – who are currently under fire over face-to-face appointments – for all their “outstanding” hard work and professionalism over the last two years.



READ SOURCE

Leave a Reply

This website uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you accept our use of cookies.