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East Central High School in Samsung Solve for Tomorrow contest – WXXV News 25


Students from East Central High School are being recognized nationally for their ideas to affect change in their local community using STEM education.

Selected from a pool of more than 1,000 applicants, East Central High School’s Science Club has been selected as one of 100 state winners in the 12th annual Samsung Solve for tomorrow contest.

As a state winner, East Central High School will receive $6,500 as well as a video kit to help them with the next phase of the contest. Science teacher Shawn Chesser said, “It’s the students. I mean, I’m just proud of them as I can be. The work that they’ve put into this is amazing.”

The nationwide competition challenges students in grades sixth through 12 to use STEM skills to address real-world issues in their communities.

For the competition, the nine members of the science club designed a portable wildfire emergency shelter that is fire-resistant, insulated, and compact enough to be stored easily. “We had happened to catch a Netflix documentary that talked about people being hurt or injured or killed when they tried to evacuate a wildfire, and we wanted to see if we can build something that can help them.”

According to statesasrisk.org, nearly 1.7 million people in Mississippi or 57 percent of the state’s population are at an elevated risk of wildfire. This shelter is designed to protect multiple people during an emergency situation. Tenth grader Kameryn Bardwell said, “We really found a passion in this wildfire issue and bringing to light that the wildfire issue is not just in the west but that it’s throughout the United States and throughout the world.”

In the next phase of the competition, ten national finalist schools will be selected to participate in a pitch event where they will present their project to a panel of judges.

Seven of these schools will be awarded $50,000 in technology and prizes while the remaining three will be named national winners and will be given $100,000. Tenth grader Avery Rogers said, “It’s not common that our school gets called out for these great things because it’s such a small school. Being able to be recognized for this is very good.”





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