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Electric cars won't replace petrol before supply chain improvements – NW Evening Mail


ELECTRIC cars still have some way to go before they replace petrol.

Figures from Experian Catalyst show average petrol pump prices moved within a fraction of 1p of the record on Thursday, reaching 142.16p per litre.

The highest price recorded is 142.48p in April 2012.

Average diesel prices on Thursday were 145.68p.

The AA said wholesale price increases since the summer should have resulted in diesel setting new records, with petrol still around 2.5p off its all-time high.

Sean Stillwell said: “Sucks for those with fossil fuel powered vehicles but at the same time; I’m loving the fact that with a battery electric vehicle I’m not affected by the gas/petrol/benzin/diesel prices.

“Furthermore, electricity is not prone to changing with the seasons so it’s cheaper right now year round then fossil fuels.

“Another plus; no catalytic converter is installed so there’s no risk of having a catalytic converter stolen (battery pack takes the place of the exhaust system-including the catalytic converter)”

James Coombe replied: “Yeah – but most drivers have probably saved about £40000+ by not buying an electric vehicle.

“Good luck when electricity prices soar in the next few years.”

Stewart Williams said: “Your vehicle runs on coal, gas, nuclear power to produce electricity.

“Electric cars are made from four car plants that are dotted in four corners of the world, each car goes by train, plane or cargo ship to the final plant. To then be finally constructed into a car. Again to then to be placed on yet another cargo ship not electric or diesel train or electric going though numerous countries.

Lisa Marson said: “Millions of cars using millions of batteries. Where will they be dumped when they are no longer fit for purpose? You may not be affected yet but we all will be in the long run one way or another!”





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