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Is Facebook going to sue whistleblower Frances Haugen? – California News Times


Video above: Facebook executives responding to whistleblower testimony Facebook recently took a harsher tone against whistleblower Frances Haugen, copying inside before Haugen quit his job earlier this year After publishing the investigation, it suggests that social networks may be considering legal retaliation. US law protects whistleblowers who disclose information to the government about potential illegal activity. However, that protection does not necessarily cover bringing corporate secrets into the media. The company itself as a legitimate Godzilla trampling a woman who says she is doing the right thing to sue Haugen, who may discourage other employees who may speak in other ways. You need to consider whether it is worth casting. Whistleblowers are often at risk of occupational damage (other companies may hesitate to hire them in the future) and personal attacks. Facebook did not answer the email question. What did Haugen do? Haugen secretly copied a pile of Facebook’s internal documents before leaving the company, then complained to the Securities and Exchange Commission to lawyers, claiming that Facebook was hiding what it knew about the negative effects of the platform. I made a complaint. Her lawyer, John Tye, said the team submitted an edited document to Congress, where Hogen testified on Tuesday and also notified California officials. Haugen also shared a document with The Wall Street Journal, which began speaking in December, leading to a series of explosive stories that began in mid-September. What was Facebook’s reaction? The company says it is mischaracterized. “I don’t think most of us are aware of the false picture of the company being drawn,” CEO Mark Zuckerberg told employees Tuesday. In an Associated Press interview Thursday, Facebook executive Monica Bickart repeatedly referred to Hogen’s copy of the document as “stolen.” This is the word she used in other media interviews. David Kolapinto, a lawyer for Korn, Korn, and Korapinto, who specializes in whistleblower cases, said the language was threatened. In the same interview, when Facebook asked whether to sue or retaliate against whistleblowers, Bickart said, “I can’t answer.” A week ago, Facebook’s Global Safety Officer Antigone Davis was in the Senate. Facebook testified that “speaking to Congress will never retaliate against anyone.” Journal.IS HAUGEN PROTECTED? Various laws provide protection for whistleblowers at both state and federal levels. The federal laws that apply to Hogen are the Dodd-Frank Act, the 2010 Wall Street Reform Act, and the Serves Oxley Act, the 2002 law following the collapse of Enron and other accounting scandals. Dodd-Frank has expanded the protection of whistleblowers and empowered the SEC to take action against companies that threaten whistleblowers. According to experts, protection exists for both employees and ex-employees. When asked about the risks of her going to the media, Hogen’s lawyer, Thailand, claims that Hogen is entitled to whistleblower protection because she went to the SEC, Congress, and state authorities. He said the proceedings from Facebook were “insignificant” and Facebook was out of touch. Regarding her leak to the media, the court has not tested whether the leak to the media is protected by Dodd-Frank Act, but Mr. Colapinto said the U.S. Labor Secretary said decades ago that environmental and nuclear safety. We have determined that the communication between our whistle blower and the media is protected. He argues that Servence Oxley’s language is modeled on the basis of those early decree, and Hogen should have the same protection for any of her communications with reporters. Facebook may claim that Haugen broke nondisclosure agreements by sharing company documents with the press, divulging corporate secrets, and making comments that Facebook considers defamation. Lisa Banks of Katz, Marshall and Banks, who have been working on whistleblowers for decades, said. “Like many whistleblowers, she is very brave and is exposed to personal and professional risks in shedding light on these practices,” she said. Kolapinto said her disclosure had charitable purposes that could complicate the implementation of NDAs if Facebook chose to do so. “If they chase her, it’s not necessarily because they think they’re legally in a strong proceeding, but they send a message to other whistle blower candidates that they’re going to play a hard ball. “Banks said. But she said it would be a “catastrophe” for Facebook to chase Hogen. Regardless of potential legal vulnerabilities, Facebook may look like a bully if Facebook filed a proceeding against her. To the courageous individual whistleblower. ”

Video above: Facebook executives respond to whistleblower testimony

Facebook has recently taken a tougher tone against whistleblower Francis Haugen, and social networks are considering legal retaliation after releasing an internal investigation that Haugen copied before quitting his job earlier this year. It suggests that there is a possibility.

US law protects whistleblowers who disclose information to the government about potential illegal activity. However, that protection does not necessarily cover bringing corporate secrets into the media.

Facebook still has to walk the subtle lines. The company itself as a legitimate Godzilla trampling a woman who says she is doing the right thing to sue Haugen, who may discourage other employees who may speak in other ways. You need to consider whether it is worth casting.

Haugen may face other consequences. Whistleblowers are often at risk of professional damage, and other companies may hesitate to hire whistleblowers in the future.

Facebook did not respond to the question sent by email.

What did Haugen do?

Haugen secretly copied a pile of Facebook’s internal documents before leaving the company, then complained to the Securities and Exchange Commission to lawyers, claiming that Facebook was hiding what it knew about the negative effects of the platform. I made a complaint.

Her lawyer, John Tye, said the team submitted an edited document to Congress, where Hogen testified on Tuesday and also notified California officials. Haugen also shared a document with The Wall Street Journal, which began speaking in December, leading to a series of explosive stories that began in mid-September.

How was the reaction of FACEBOOK?

The company says it is mischaracterized. “I don’t think most of us are aware of the false picture of the company being painted,” CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote to an employee on Tuesday.

Some business people are beginning to use harsher language to describe Hogen’s actions, which can be interpreted as threatening.

In an Associated Press interview Thursday, Facebook executive Monica Bickart repeatedly referred to Hogen’s copy of the document as “stolen.” This is the word she used in other media interviews. David Kolapinto, a lawyer for Korn, Korn, and Korapinto, who specializes in whistleblower cases, said the language was threatened.

In the same interview, when asked if Facebook would sue or retaliate against the whistleblower, Bickart simply said, “I can’t answer that.”

A week ago, Facebook’s Global Safety Officer Antigone Davis testified in the Senate that Facebook “never retaliates against anyone by talking to Congress.”

Is Haugen protected?

Various laws provide protection for whistleblowers at both state and federal levels. The federal laws that apply to Hogen are the Dodd-Frank Act, the 2010 Wall Street Reform Act, and the Serves Oxley Act, the 2002 law following the collapse of Enron and other accounting scandals.

Dodd-Frank has expanded the protection of whistleblowers and empowered the SEC to take action against companies that threaten whistleblowers. According to experts, protection exists for both employees and ex-employees.

Asked about her risks because she went to the media, Hogen’s lawyer, Thailand, claimed she was eligible for whistleblower protection because Hogen went to the SEC, Congress and state authorities. increase. He said the proceedings from Facebook were “insignificant” and Facebook was out of touch.

What about her leak to the media?

The court has not tested whether the leak to the media is protected under the Dodd-Frank Act, but Mr. Colapinto said that the U.S. Secretary of Labor was a media outlet for environmental and nuclear safety whistle blowers decades ago. He said he determined that communication with was protected. He argues that Servence Oxley’s language is modeled on the basis of those early decree, and Hogen should have the same protection for any of her communications with reporters.

Facebook may claim that Haugen broke nondisclosure agreements by sharing company documents with the press, divulging corporate secrets, and making comments that Facebook considers defamation. Lisa Banks of Katz, Marshall and Banks, who have been working on whistleblowers for decades, said. “Like many whistleblowers, she is very brave and is exposed to personal and professional risks in shedding light on these practices,” she said.

Haugen effectively used the leak to the media to increase pressure on parliamentary and government regulators. Kolapinto said her disclosure has charitable purposes and could complicate the implementation of NDAs if Facebook chooses to do so.

Can I do Facebook Face Blowback?

Facebook probably wants its hidden threat to anxiety other and ex-employees who may want to speak up. “If they chase her, it’s not necessarily because they think they’re legally in a strong proceeding, but they send a message to other whistle blower candidates that they’re going to play a hard ball. “Banks said.

But she said it would be a “catastrophe” for Facebook to chase Hogen. Regardless of potential legal vulnerabilities, Facebook could look like a bully if Facebook filed a proceeding against her.

“The last thing Facebook needs is to arouse the wrath of government officials and the general public by acting as a big bad megacorporation against courageous individual whistleblowers,” said the company Getnick. Neil Getnick, whose Getnick represents the whistleblower, said.

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