LIDL is urgently recalling batches of chocolate bars after a packaging error means that some of the snacks contain peanuts.

Shoppers who know that they are allergic to the nuts are advised not to eat Mister Choc Choco & Caramel Bars for fears it will trigger potentially deadly allergies.

 Lidl is recalling the snacks over fears they could trigger peanut allergies

Lidl

Lidl is recalling the snacks over fears they could trigger peanut allergies

People with a peanut allergy can suffer from symptoms such as a tightening of the throat, skins reaction and shortness of breath when they come into contact with them.

In severe cases, an allergy attack can be life threatening causing them to go into anaphylactic shock.

Peanut allergies are really common and can be triggered by touching one – it doesn’t even have to be eaten.

In a notice issued on the Food Standards Agency website, the retailer explained that some of its own-brand caramel peanut bars were accidentally packaged in choco and caramel snack packaging instead.

Your product recall rights

PRODUCT recalls are an important means of protecting consumers from dangerous goods.

As a general rule, if a recall involves a branded product, the manufacturer would usually have lead responsibility for the recall action.

But it’s often left up to supermarkets to notify customers when products could put them at risk.

If you are concerned about the safety of a product you own, always check the manufacturer’s website to see if a safety notice has been issued.

When it comes to appliances, rather than just food items, the onus is usually on you – the customer – to register the appliance with the manufacturer as if you don’t there is no way of contacting you to tell you about a fault.

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If you become aware that an item you own has been recalled or has any safety noticed issued against it, make sure you follow the instructions given to you by the manufacturer.

They should usually provide you with more information and a contact number on its safety notice.

In some cases, the manufacturer might ask you to return the item for a full redund or arrange for the faulty product to be collected.

You should not be charged for any recall work – such as a repair, replacement or collection of the recalled item.

This means that it’s not clear in the packaging that they could contain nuts.

There are two fingers per snack, and they can be bought in bags of six for 70p.

All batches with an expiry date of January 2020 are being recalled – the discounter has also already pulled the products from shelves.

Customers who have any of the snacks at home should return them to their nearest store in exchange for a full refund. You don’t need to bring your receipt.

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Last month, Lidl also pulled Sondey biscuits from shelves after they were found to contain peanuts, gluten, sesame, milk and hazelnuts, which may not be mentioned on the packaging, according to the Food Standards Agency (FSA).

Other recalls to look out for include two chocolate treats by Poundstretcher, which contain egg and wheat which isn’t clearly labelled on the packaging.

Chicken breast fillets from Nisa convenience shops are being urgently recalled because they have the wrong use-by date printed on the label.

Lidl recalls biscuits due to fears they could trigger deadly allergic reactions


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