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MCMS named state winner for Samsung Solve for Tomorrow Contest – newberryobserver.com



Mid-Carolina Middle School was recently named a South Carolina state winner for its proposed plan to address the problem of children and infants dying from hyperthermia when left unattended in locked vehicles. Pictured, left to right, are team members Rae Livingston, Zoe Reid, Jack Gantt and Gage Gilliam. – Courtesy photo

The team’s CO2 and Temperature Sensor/Alarm System. – Courtesy photo

PROSPERITY — The Samsung Solve for Tomorrow Contest encourages teachers and students to solve real-world issues in their community using classroom skills in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Selected from thousands of entries nationwide, Mid-Carolina Middle School was named a South Carolina state winner for its proposed plan to address the problem of children and infants dying from hyperthermia when left unattended in locked vehicles. The team’s solution is a sensor-alarm system that monitors CO2 levels and temperature and sets off high intensity LEDs. The system will serve as a reminder to parents to remove children from the vehicle, as well as an alarm to attract the attention of bystanders so they will respond immediately to help the child.

Project Lead the Way teacher, Cecilia Kelly, was team sponsor.

Team members were: Gage Gilliam — learned about electronics from mentor and was able to build and demonstrate the sensor for Sheriff Lee Foster.

Jack Gantt — researched the neurobiological conditions that can lead to adults forgetting a child is in the car and created a brochure to educate the public on this topic.

Rae Livingston — researched how to do CPR on babies, children, and pets; researched which light waves best attract attention; worked with mentor to construct testing environments and to learn about CO2 levels produced by age and weight.

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Zoe Reid — researched patents for technology and products that already exist, as well as South Carolina’s Good Samaritan Law.

Students worked on the project after school, on weekends, and at home on their own.

The team met with Sheriff Lee Foster to discuss the project and to demonstrate the sensor. The team’s plan is to produce the sensor at cost through donations and distribute them free of charge to the community, through the Sheriff’s Department. Future development is needed to reach this goal. Gregory Kelly mentored Gage Gilliam in the engineering of the sensor and Brandon Kelly mentored Rae Livingston in the Biological science aspect of human CO2 production rates.

Mid-Carolina Middle will receive $15,000 in technology for the team’s achievement.

“Samsung is extremely proud of the evolution of the Solve for Tomorrow platform over the past 10 years: fueling students’ passion and curiosity to tackle issues that impact their communities in unexpected and creative ways,” said Ann Woo, Senior Director of Corporate Citizenship at Samsung Electronics America. “Reading the innovative proposals students and teachers have put forth this year exemplifies what we know to be true for every student – that young minds have just as much to teach as they do to learn. Our guiding citizenship vision is ‘Enabling People,’ and we are thrilled to celebrate another year of empowering future innovators to achieve their full potential through STEM learning.”



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