Monday’s FrankTalks will focus on transportation as South Corridor Study is presented

By JOHN McBRYDE

The South Corridor Study, which was publicly launched earlier this year to evaluate transportation options along the 35-mile corridor between downtown Nashville and southward to Columbia, will be the topic of discussion at Monday’s FrankTalks lecture at First Presbyterian Church in Franklin.

The event will begin at 9 a.m. with a 30-minute coffee social, followed by the presentation at 9:30 by Doug Delaney, senior supervising planner for the consulting firm WSP Nashville, and others participating in the study. The comprehensive transportation study, which last held a public meeting in May, will also be updated at the work session for the Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen Tuesday at 5 p.m. at Franklin City Hall.

The major transportation routes included in this corridor are Interstate 65, Franklin Pike (SR-6/US 31)
and the CSX railway. Williamson County is at the center of the study being led through a partnership by The Greater Nashville Regional Council (GNRC), WeGo Public Transportation and the Tennessee Department of Transportation.

 

The study will identify a series of short-, mid-, and long-term recommendations to implement the vision for rapid transit between Nashville, Berry Hill, Oak Hill, Brentwood, Franklin, Thompson‘s Station, Spring Hill and Columbia, as well as other neighborhoods, communities, employment centers and destinations along the 35-mile south corridor.

Delaney led the community meetings that were held in Franklin, Brentwood, Columbia and Nashville in late April to early May, from which public input was taken and analyzed by project organizers over the summer.

“The reason we’re looking at the south corridor, and this will hopefully come as no surprise to anyone, is the region is growing and will continue to grow,” Delaney said during the Franklin meeting. “By 2040, we’re going to have more people, we’re going to have more roadway volume, more jobs — and what that ultimately means is we’re all likely going to spend more time driving and sitting in traffic.”

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Delaney has experience in community and regional planning, transportation, public involvement and outreach, transit studies, environmental studies, environmental management systems and context-sensitive solutions.

Prior to joining WSP, Delaney served both as the assistant chief of Environment and Planning and director of the Environmental Division for TDOT.

FrankTalks is a Franklin Tomorrow monthly lecture presented in partnership with Williamson Medical Center as a sustaining partner and Renasant Bank, a presenting partner.

First Presbyterian Church is located at 101 Legends Club Lane.





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