PARENTS have been warned to keep babies away from teething necklaces and bracelets after a tot was strangled.

The trinkets, used by baby with teething pain and as sensory toys for kids with autism or ADHD, have been linked to several injuries and even death.

 Experts have warned parents not to use teething bracelets after several instances of choking and strangulation

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Experts have warned parents not to use teething bracelets after several instances of choking and strangulation

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reports that an 18-month old boy was strangled to death by a teething necklace during a nap.

Babies start teething at around four to six months of age.

It’s a painful process, and often nippers become unsettled, teary and start chewing on objects during this time as their gnashers push through.

The teething jewellery was seen as a solution as the baby can wear it all the time, and always have it to hand to gnaw on.

 Teething can cause tots major distress, making them teary and prone to chewing on things

Getty – Contributor

Teething can cause tots major distress, making them teary and prone to chewing on things
 Manufacturers claim the resin in the beads helps ease tots' suffering. But the FDA has warned against using them
Manufacturers claim the resin in the beads helps ease tots’ suffering. But the FDA has warned against using them

Manufacturers say the resin in them also helps soothe the inflammation and ease the pain.

But the FDA, A US based agency, urged: “We’re concerned about the risks we’ve observed with these products and want parents to be aware that teething jewelry puts children, including those with special needs, at risk of serious injury and death.

“Consumers should consider following the American Academy of Pediatrics’ recommendations of alternative ways for treating teething pain, such as rubbing inflamed gums with a clean finger or using a teething ring made of firm rubber.”

It says risks include choking, strangulation, injury to the mouth and infection.

The FDA adds that it has “not evaluated these claims for safety or effectiveness and recommends parents not use these products.”

Earlier this week, we revealed that supermarkets are going to stop stocking teething gels.

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That’s because there’s a lack of evidence that teething gels relieve pain in teething babies, health experts have warned.

If you’re worried your child has suffered any side effects from using a teething gel you should speak to a GP.

You can also report any products through the MHRA’s yellow card scheme.


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