With just over 90 minutes to go until the launch, we’ve got time to hear from SpaceX about what today’s test hopes to achieve:

 

This test, which does not have Nasa astronauts onboard the spacecraft, is intended to demonstrate Crew Dragon’s ability to reliably carry crew to safety in the unlikely event of an emergency on ascent.

 

If the In-Flight Abort Test is successful, the Crew Dragon capsule will separate from the Falcon 9 rocket shortly after lift-off at the moment of “peak mechanical stress”.

 

While the rocket experiences a “rapid, unscheduled disassembly”, the Crew Dragon spacecraft will deploy its parachutes and float safely to the ground.

 

SpaceX and Nasa can then begin planning for crewed missions to the ISS using Crew Dragon.



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