About a year ago, we featured a Detroit home with mind-blowing interiors that blew the lid off the internet. The uniquely decorated home, with each room more eye-popping than the next, ranked among our most popular homes for weeks.

When it initially came on the market, it was priced at $550,000, which included all of the furnishings and decor, along with the vintage collectibles. But even after all the attention and notoriety, the awesome abode is still available—now for $374,900.

The home was painstakingly curated and filled with kitsch of all kinds, including a baby grand piano, fountains, lots and lots of statues, and two custom-built classic cars.

The rooms are all themed, from the white and silver living room to the lime-green kitchen, to the statues and artwork pretty much everywhere. The homeowner, Ronald Nassar, who’s retired, spent a lifetime building this personal masterpiece.

We were sure all that attention would attract a collector who could appreciate the vintage cars and 1950s appliances in mint condition, along with the unique pool and cabana in the backyard. But a buyer has yet to materialize to take ownership of all of this stuff.

Here are a few things we’ve learned about the challenges of selling such an unusual place.

Internet fame doesn’t always pay off

While most looky-loos don’t turn into buyers, there was hope an interested party might emerge from the onslaught of online publicity. But no.

“It didn’t really help at all,” says listing agent Benjamin Ness. “I’ve never had anything like the publicity when we listed.”

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While Ness was happy for the attention, “we only got a handful of showings off of it,” he says.

Even so, Ness is nowhere near ready to wave the white flag: “Any publicity is good; the more eyes on the prize, the more likely you are to find the right person. The lack of a buyer has more to do [with] the atypical nature of the house.”

Living room
Living room

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Kitchen
Kitchen

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What’s priceless to you may not have value to others

The owner spent decades filling his home with memorabilia and tchotchkes, all curated to his liking. But these items haven’t resonated with buyers or collectors.

The listing agent has spoken with auction houses about possibly selling the interior items separately, including the cars. But “we have not been able to get any traction,” he says. 

Mirrored ceiling
Mirrored ceiling

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Crocheted ceiling
Crocheted ceiling

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The price wasn’t quite right

While the owner sees the price as a reflection of both the residence and his prized possessions, the market didn’t agree.

“Nothing sold remotely close to what he’s looking for it,” Ness says. “The seller is very attached to selling all his possessions in addition to the property.”

He points out prices on rehabbed homes in the area range between $150,000 and $200,000. Currently, the home is asking $374,900. This represents a 32% drop from the original list price. And, hey, if you want to come in at a lower price, the listing encourages you to “Make an offer, seller is motivated!”

Player piano
Player piano

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The yard
The yard

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A new hope

The owner and his eccentric house add to the unique flair of the Motor City housing market, Ness says. Perhaps the market will eventually see it their way.

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Ness says he sees signs of a “ripening” market: “We’re just hoping for the right buyer to come along. We can’t enhance or embellish the marketing we did for it. We just keep pushing to find someone who shares the vision.”

Watch: We’re Crazy for This Detroit Home’s Insane Decor



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